vendredi 8 mars 2013

Californian Ideology.

Foster + Partners, Apple Headquarters, 2011.

Foster + Partners, Apple Headquarters, 2011.

Foster & Partners, Apple Headquarters, 2011.

At the end of the twentieth century, the long predicted convergence of the media, computing and telecommunications into hypermedia is finally happening (1). Once again, capitalism's relentless drive to diversify and intensify the creative powers of human labour is on the verge of qualitatively transforming the way in which we work, play and live together. By integrating different technologies around common protocols, something is being created which is more than the sum of its parts. When the ability to produce and receive unlimited amounts of information in any form is combined with the reach of the global telephone networks, existing forms of work and leisure can be fundamentally transformed. New industries will be born and current stock market favourites will be swept away. At such moments of profound social change, anyone who can offer a simple explanation of what is happening will be listened to with great interest. At this crucial juncture, a loose alliance of writers, hackers, capitalists and artists from the West Coast of the USA have succeeded in defining a heterogeneous orthodoxy for the coming information age : the Californian Ideology. 

This new faith has emerged from a bizarre fusion of the cultural bohemianism of San Francisco with the hi-tech industries of Silicon Valley. Promoted in magazines, books, tv programmes, Web sites, newsgroups and Net conferences, the Californian Ideology promiscuously combines the free-wheeling spirit of the hippies and the entrepreneurial zeal of the yuppies. This amalgamation of opposites has been achieved through a profound faith in the emancipatory potential of the new information technologies. In the digital utopia, everybody will be both hip and rich. Not surprisingly, this optimistic vision of the future has been enthusiastically embraced by computer nerds, slacker students, innovative capitalists, social activists, trendy academics, futurist bureaucrats and opportunistic politicians across the USA. As usual, Europeans have not been slow in copying the latest fad from America. While a recent EU Commission report recommends following the Californian 'free market' model for building the 'information superhighway', cutting-edge artists and academics eagerly imitate the 'post- human' philosophers of the West Coast's Extropian cult (2). With no obvious rivals, the triumph of the Californian Ideology appears to be complete. 

See here and there.

Richard Barbrook & Andy Cameron, The Californian Ideology in Mute, issue n°3, 1995. 

Notes. 

1. For over 25 years, experts have been predicting the imminent arrival of the information age. See Alain Touraine, La Société Post-Industrielle, Paris, 1969 ; Zbigniew Brzezinski, Between Two Ages : America's Role in the Technetronic Era, New York, 1970 ; Daniel Bell, The Coming of the Post-Industrial Society, New York, 1973 ; Alvin Toffler, The Third Wave, London, 1980 ; Simon Nora and Alain Minc, The Computerisation of Society, Cambridge, 1980 & Ithiel de Sola Pool, Technologies of Freedom, Harvard, 1983. 
2. See Martin Bangemann, Europe and the Global Information Society, Brussels, 1994 (available through http://www.echo.lu/) and the programme and abstracts of the Warwick University's "Virtual Futures 95 Conference".

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